Just a Bunch of Silly Pictures of Me and my Dog, on the Occasion of Her Adoption Day

Exactly 11 years ago, I brought Maggie home for the first time. A few days later, I took this picture.

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This was the first in a long line of silly pictures of Maggie and me.

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Eventually, I realized how much she hated being picked up, and I found new ways to make her hate being photographed.

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The past eleven years have had many ups and downs, but the constant source of happiness, stability, and love is this pup.

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I took this one on the scariest day of our lives together; the morning I dropped her off for her cancer surgery.

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And took this one once she was home.

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We’ve both got a little more gray in our beards these days, but we’re going to keep taking silly pictures every chance we get.

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Maggie D, you’re the best. Happy adoption day, little bear.

 

The Big Reveal

After much planning, estimating, digging, hauling, welding, grading, planting, adjusting, and obsessing, my back yard is complete. I’m thrilled with how it turned out and am excited to share the first pictures of it today. But before we get to that, here’s a 2-minute timelapse video that shows where we started, and how we got here.

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Before:
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After:IMG_1403.jpg

Shouts out to Humzah Khraim of Seasonswood Group here in Atlanta for a beautiful design and a job well done—if you’re in Atlanta I highly recommend working with him.

Now… I’ve got to buy some furniture for this back porch. 🤣

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Steel going up

Haven’t posted in a few days because not much has happened for a few days. But today, things really started to take shape. Before, my back yard undulated like hills on a putt-putt golf course, for reasons passing understanding. The new layout deals with the slope by terracing the yard with this cool cor-ten weathering steel (you can see the same stuff used in my neighbors’ garden on the left).

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I’m still kind of blown away by the changes, though it’s still basically just a mud pit. But I can finally visualize the end result now, and I think it’s gonna be good.

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Progress, generally

Well, we’ve reached the point that I’m having to take the pups to the front yard to do their business, as the back is a muddy wreck. But it’s pretty exciting to see it happen. I bought the house and moved in while they were still finishing the original back yard, so I’m familiar with Georgia red clay. This time I’m so much more excited about what’s coming next, I don’t even care.

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This guy’s not impressed, though.

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Check is in the mail.

Well, it’s official. My ugly backyard is about to become a lot less ugly.

Sadly, there was one casualty in the process—turns out there wasn’t room in my budget for the concrete work I mentioned before. Still, they’re going to be building some planters out of cor-ten weathering steel, which I think are going to be amazing.

Concrete

Back to thinking about house stuff for a little while, as I’ve started working with a landscape designer. These are some options for concrete finishes in some stuff we might be building. Yes, I realize how boring a literal picture of concrete is, but this is the kind of minutiae I revel in. And I hope it becomes part of a before & after that’s as satisfying as this one (before, after) soon.

All Hands on Deck

ATL Urbanist

It’s not that MARTA doesn’t go anywhere, it’s that we haven’t built anywhere worth going to around MARTA.

Published on Oct. 28, 2016 by Matthew Garbett

There’s a good piece in StreetsBlog about the benefits to transit in Atlanta if the MARTA expansion tax passes. These include doubling bus frequencies, 30 miles of light rail, Bus Rapid Transit, infill stations and more.

It’s an important stepfor Atlanta’s future as a city who’s population is expected to double or triple in the next 35 years, and critical for our attempts to be a more walkable, transit oriented city.

But it’s only an important first step. As Sam Newburg of Joe Urban puts it:

“Rail miles, lines and stations are important, but equally if not more so is the fabric of the city once people step off the platform.That is where we must set ourselves apart, and that requires…

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